From the west

Dungiven Priory

Dungiven comes from the Irish Dún Geimhin, meaning "Gevin's fort". It is believed that a Celtic monastery was founded here by St Nechtan in the 7th century. In the early 12th century the monastery was succeeded by a Priory associated with the Dermot O'Cathain, Chief of the O'Cathain Sept, for the Augustinian Canons. The chancel, which was added in the 13th century, is separated from the nave by a wooden partition. Inside it is a tomb traditionally believed to be that of Cooey-na-Gall O'Cahan, an O'Cahan Chief who died in 1385, but it may be later. A key to the chancel can be acquired from the local priest. There was an engaged round tower in the southwest corner of the nave. A tower house was later added to the west end and later in the 17th century a large house was erected, by Sir Edward Doddington, to the south of the tower house.

North wall

Nave

Situated: On the southside of Dungiven. Priory Lane is sign-posted on the west side of the A6.

Google Map.

Discoverer Map 7:C 6914 0828. Last visit June 2013.

Longitude: 6° 55' 18" W

Latitude: 54° 55' 2" N

Photo: Jim Dempsey.

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