Glanfahan

Clochauns/Clocháns

The most common type of hut situated on the Dingle Peninsula is the drystone variety known as clochauns. They are often referred to as beehive huts because of their shape. Clochauns were a common type of dwelling during the early Christian period and most of the remaining examples are indeed associated with early Christian sites. Nowhere are they more common than the southwest coast of the dingle peninsula - just 1.5 klms east of here is Caher Conor stone fort. Because they are so plentiful here Peter Harbison suggests they may have been used to house pilgrims. There are many pilgrimage sites in the area, including Skellig Michael.

The first modern beehive hut

A relatively modern hut

The clochauns on this page are situated in a small cluster on the southern slopes of Mount Eagle overlooking Dingle Bay. As you enter the field on the right of the farmhouse there is a modern 'beehive-hut' pictured above located in the farmyard. To the west of this is the ruin of another hut. To the east of the farmhouse is a triple clochaun known as Caheradurras, see top image. The entrance to these co-joined clochauns is at the south east of the central clochaun. Also in the middle clochaun in the entrance to an L-shaped souterrain. There is a small subsidiary chamber to the south east of the eastern hut but this may be a later addition. Further up the mountain is the modern hut pictured left which was built within the remains of an earlier one. Above this hut is a pair of co-joined drystone corbelled clochauns known as Clochán Mór. See below.

Situated: From Ventry take the R559 west towards Slea Head. About 2 kilometres after the car-park for Dunbeg fort is another pull in. The Clochauns are in the field to the right of the farmhouse. 2 Euro entrance fee.

Discovery Map 70: V 3280 9700. Last visit July 2011.

Longitude: 10° 26' 18.77 " W

Latitude: 52° 05' 59.05" N

Google Map

Photos: Jim Dempsey and Deb Snelson.

Passage between huts

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